2021 Consumer Confidence Report


2021 Consumer Confidence Report for Public Water System CITY OF STRAWN

This is your water quality report for January 1 to December 31, 2021

For more information regarding this report contact:

CITY OF STRAWN provides surface water and ground water from [insert source name of aquifer, reservoir, and/or river] located in [insert name of County or City].

Name   _____Danny MIller________________________

Phone  ____(254) 672-5311________________________

Este reporte incluye información importante sobre el agua para tomar.  Para asistencia en español, favor de llamar al telefono (254) 672-5311.

Definitions and Abbreviations

Definitions and Abbreviations

The following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation.

Action Level:

The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Avg:

Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.

Level 1 Assessment:

A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.

Level 2 Assessment:

A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL:

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG:

The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL:

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG:

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

MFL

million fibers per liter (a measure of asbestos)

mrem:

millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)

na:

not applicable.

NTU

nephelometric turbidity units (a measure of turbidity)

pCi/L

picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)


Definitions and Abbreviations

ppb:

micrograms per liter or parts per billion

ppm:

milligrams per liter or parts per million

ppq

parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter (pg/L)

ppt

parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter (ng/L)

Treatment Technique or TT:

A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Information about your Drinking Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

-   Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

-   Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

-   Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

-   Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

-   Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Contaminants may be found in drinking water that may cause taste, color, or odor problems.  These types of problems are not necessarily causes for health concerns.  For more information on taste, odor, or color of drinking water, please contact the system's business office.

You may be more vulnerable than the general population to certain microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, in drinking water.  Infants, some elderly, or immunocompromised persons such as those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer; persons who have undergone organ transplants; those who are undergoing treatment with steroids; and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, can be particularly at risk from infections. You should seek advice about drinking water from your physician or health care providers.  Additional guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).


If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but we cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Information about Source Water

TCEQ completed an assessment of your source water, and results indicate that some of our sources are susceptible to certain contaminants. The sampling requirements for your water system is based on this susceptibility and previous sample data. Any detections of these contaminants will be found in this Consumer Confidence Report. For more information on source water assessments and protection efforts at our system contact [insert water system contact][insert phone number]

Lead and Copper

Date Sampled

MCLG

Action Level (AL)

90th Percentile

# Sites Over AL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper

2021

1.3

1.3

0.306

0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Lead

2021

0

15

9.77

1

ppb

N

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

2021 Water Quality Test Results

2021

Disinfection By-Products

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Individual Samples

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

2021

67

20.2 - 134

No goal for the total

60

ppb

Y

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

*The value in the Highest Level or Average Detected column is the highest average of all HAA5 sample results collected at a location over a year


Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

2021

84

36 - 140

No goal for the total

80

ppb

Y

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

*The value in the Highest Level or Average Detected column is the highest average of all TTHM sample results collected at a location over a year

2021

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Individual Samples

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Barium

2021

0.084

0.084 - 0.084

2

2

ppm

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

Cyanide

2021

21

21 - 21

200

200

ppb

N

Discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories; Discharge from steel/metal factories.

Fluoride

2021

0.1

0.101 - 0.101

4

4.0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen]

2021

5

0.125 - 4.95

10

10

ppm

N

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

2021

Radioactive Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Individual Samples

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Beta/photon emitters

02/24/2020

4.5

4.5 - 4.5

0

50

pCi/L*

N

Decay of natural and man-made deposits.

*EPA considers 50 pCi/L to be the level of concern for beta particles.

Combined Radium 226/228

02/24/2020

2.46

2.46 - 2.46

0

5

pCi/L

N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Gross alpha excluding radon and uranium

02/24/2020

9

9 - 9

0

15

pCi/L

N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Uranium

02/24/2020

1.1

1.1 - 1.1

0

30

ug/l

N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Disinfectant Residual

A blank disinfectant residual table has been added to the CCR template, you will need to add data to the fields. Your data can be taken off the Disinfectant Level Quarterly Operating Reports (DLQOR).

Disinfectant Residual

Year

Average Level

Range of Levels Detected

MRDL

MRDLG

Unit of Measure

Violation (Y/N)

Source in Drinking Water


2021

4

4

ppm

Water additive used to control microbes.

Turbidity

Level Detected

Limit (Treatment Technique)

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Highest single measurement

0.3 NTU

1 NTU

N

Soil runoff.

Lowest monthly % meeting limit

100%

0.3 NTU

N

Soil runoff.

Information Statement:  Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles.  We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration system and disinfectants.

Total Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set, unless a TOC violation is noted in the violations section.

Violations

Consumer Confidence Rule

The Consumer Confidence Rule requires community water systems to prepare and provide to their customers annual consumer confidence reports on the quality of the water delivered by the systems.

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

CCR REPORT

07/01/2020

07/23/2021

We failed to provide to you, our drinking water customers, an annual report that informs you about the quality of our drinking water and characterizes the risks from exposure to contaminants detected in our drinking water.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

Some people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

MCL, LRAA

04/01/2021

06/30/2021

Water samples showed that the amount of this contaminant in our drinking water was above its standard (called a maximum contaminant level and abbreviated MCL) for the period indicated.


Violations

MCL, LRAA

10/01/2021

12/31/2021

Water samples showed that the amount of this contaminant in our drinking water was above its standard (called a maximum contaminant level and abbreviated MCL) for the period indicated.

Lead and Copper Rule

The Lead and Copper Rule protects public health by minimizing lead and copper levels in drinking water, primarily by reducing water corrosivity. Lead and copper enter drinking water mainly from corrosion of lead and copper containing plumbing materials.

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

LEAD CONSUMER NOTICE (LCR)

04/01/2021

2021

We failed to provide the results of lead tap water monitoring to the consumers at the location water was tested. These were supposed to be provided no later than 30 days after learning the results.

LEAD CONSUMER NOTICE (LCR)

09/29/2021

2021

We failed to provide the results of lead tap water monitoring to the consumers at the location water was tested. These were supposed to be provided no later than 30 days after learning the results.

WATER QUALITY PARAMETER M/R (LCR)

01/01/2021

06/30/2021

We failed to test our drinking water for the contaminant and period indicated. Because of this failure, we cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during the period indicated.

Public Notification Rule

The Public Notification Rule helps to ensure that consumers will always know if there is a problem with their drinking water. These notices immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water (e.g., a boil water emergency).

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

PUBLIC NOTICE RULE LINKED TO VIOLATION

01/13/2021

2021

We failed to adequately notify you, our drinking water consumers, about a violation of the drinking water regulations.

PUBLIC NOTICE RULE LINKED TO VIOLATION

04/15/2021

2021

We failed to adequately notify you, our drinking water consumers, about a violation of the drinking water regulations.

PUBLIC NOTICE RULE LINKED TO VIOLATION

06/29/2021

2021

We failed to adequately notify you, our drinking water consumers, about a violation of the drinking water regulations.

PUBLIC NOTICE RULE LINKED TO VIOLATION

07/15/2021

2021

We failed to adequately notify you, our drinking water consumers, about a violation of the drinking water regulations.

PUBLIC NOTICE RULE LINKED TO VIOLATION

09/28/2021

2021

We failed to adequately notify you, our drinking water consumers, about a violation of the drinking water regulations.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

FAILURE SUBMIT OEL REPORT FOR TTHM

12/15/2020

02/26/2021

We failed to submit our operational evaluation level (OEL) report to our regulator. The  report is needed to determine best treatment practices necessary to minimize possible future exceedences of TTHM.

MCL, LRAA

01/01/2021

03/31/2021

Water samples showed that the amount of this contaminant in our drinking water was above its standard (called a maximum contaminant level and abbreviated MCL) for the period indicated.


Violations

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ISSUE TAX AND WATERWORKS AND SEWER SYSTEM SURPLUS REVENUE CERTIFICATES OF OBLIGATION

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ISSUE

TAX AND WATERWORKS AND SEWER SYSTEM

SURPLUS REVENUE CERTIFICATES OF OBLIGATION

          NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Strawn, Texas, will convene in the Council Chambers of the Strawn City Hall, 118 East Housley Street, Strawn, Texas at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, August 8, 2022, and, during such meeting, the City Council will consider passage of an ordinance and take such other actions as may be deemed necessary to authorize the issuance of tax and waterworks and sewer system surplus revenue certificates of obligation in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $773,000 for the purpose of paying contractual obligations of the City to be incurred for (1) the planning, design and construction of certain improvements to the City’s water system, such improvements being identified as Texas Water Development Board Project No. 62926; and (2) the payment of professional services and costs of issuance related thereto.  The certificates of obligation will be payable from the levy of an annual ad valorem tax, within the limitations prescribed by law, upon all taxable property within the City and a pledge of the surplus revenues of the City’s Waterworks and Sewer System.  The certificates of obligation are to be issued, and this notice is given, under and pursuant to the provisions of the Certificate of Obligation Act of 1971, as amended, Local Government Code, Section 271.041, et seq.

As further required by Local Government Code Section 271.049(b)(4), the following additional information is provided:

  • The current principal of all outstanding debt obligations of the City is $870,000. This amount consists of $417,000 in principal of General Obligation Bonds and $453,000 in principal of Revenue Bonds.
  • The current combined principal and interest required to pay all outstanding debt obligations of the City on time and in full is $1,229,634. This amount consists of $521,930 in principal and interest for the City’s General Obligations Bonds and $707,704 in principal and interest for the City’s Revenue Bonds.
  • The maximum principal amount of the certificates to be authorized is $773,000.
  • The estimated combined principal and interest required to pay the certificates to be authorized on time and in full is approximately $773,000.
  • The estimated interest rate for the certificates to be authorized is 0%.
  • The maximum maturity date of the certificates to be authorized is September 1, 2055.

Pursuant to Texas Local Government Code Section 271.049(c), an election on the question of the issuance of the certificates will be called if before the time tentatively set for the authorization and issuance or if before the authorization of the certificates, the City Secretary receives a petition signed by at least five percent of the qualified voters of the City protesting the issuance of the certificates, the City may not issue the certificates unless the issuance is approved at an election ordered, held and conducted in the manner provided for bond elections under Chapter 1251, Government Code. 

                                                                                    /s/ Omer Mallory                                   

Mayor, City of Strawn, Texas

Notice for Hiring Bond Counsel

01344988;1 NOTICE FOR HIRING BOND COUNSEL The City of Strawn (“City”) will be considering the approval of a contingent fee contract for legal services (“Legal Services Contract”) at the regular meeting of the City Council of the City to be held on June 13, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers of the Strawn City Hall located at 118 East Housley, Strawn, Texas. The approval of the Legal Services Contract will be considered in connection with the City’s proposed issuance of tax and waterworks and sewer system surplus revenue certificates of obligation (the “Obligations”). The City intends to select the law firm of Bickerstaff Heath Delgado Acosta LLP (“BHDA”) to serve as the City’s bond counsel in connection with the sale and issuance of the Obligations (the “Issuance”) and any other issuances of public securities by the City during the term of the Legal Services Contract. BHDA has demonstrated that it has the competence, qualifications, and experience required to serve as the City’s bond counsel in connection with the Issuance. BHDA has successfully represented Texas local governments as bond counsel in connection with the issuance of public securities such as the Obligations for over 30 years. BHDA has previously served as bond counsel to the City. Attorneys that represent local governments in transactions such as the Issuance typically are recognized for their work in the specialized area of public finance. The City’s successful sale and issuance of public securities, such as the Issuance, will require the preparation of numerous transactional documents, the compilation of those documents into a transcript, and obtaining the approval of the Attorney General of the State of Texas for the sale of the obligations, as well as other procedural steps. The City does not have any attorneys on staff that have the specialized experience required for a successful sale of the Obligations or other public securities that the City may issue. Each sale of public securities by a local government presents a unique set of legal issues and bond counsel traditionally bills for services on a contingent fee basis. Because bond counsel services are based on a fixed contingency rate, the City can know with certainty the precise amount of the fees before the sale of the public securities, and therefore, can more easily budget and plan for the use of the proceeds. For the preceding reasons, entering into a contingent fee contract for bond counsel services with BHDA is in the best interest of the residents of the City.

City Wide Cleanup 4/30/2022-8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

City of Strawn is holding a city wide cleanup for all Strawn residents and water customers.  You may bring your trash or brush to the transfer station located on Palo Pinto Avenue adjacent to the waste water treatement plant.  Disposal will be free of charge.  No tires or hazardous chemicals.  All paint must be dry.  There will also be an electronic waste recycling disposal area.

 

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City of Strawn
P.O. Box 581
118 East Housley St.
Strawn, Texas 76475
phone: 254-672-5311